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Now’s The Time: Communities United for Action, Power & Justice

By: 
Dan Horowitz de Garcia
Date Published: 
February 01, 2005
    In Georgia there are 400,000 people in jail, in prison, on probation or on parole, and 600,000 people on the state prison visitation lists. This gives the criminal justice reform movement a potential base of 1,000,000 constituents. Even a small fraction of this number is enough to turn a distant dream of reform into an inevitable reality. Today, for the first time in many years, budget realities, policy expertise, and grassroots organizing has made Georgia a prime candidate for real change.

Communities United for Action, Power & Justice is a coalition where all those working on criminal justice can expand analysis, think strategically, and build power.

For a Democratic Vision to Fight Empire

By: 
Chris Crass
Date Published: 
September 14, 2004

How do we use the Presidential election to not only advance our politics and build our organizations and movements, but also deliver a measurable blow to US imperialist power? This is the question I hear over and over again.

Our role as revolutionaries, as always, is to connect the issues, connect the opposition on different fronts, and help develop an analysis in the movement of the system that we are up against. Our role is to help build and strengthen organizations, as well as deepen the understanding of the history and power of social movements to advance justice and liberation.

Iraq, the Media, and the Art of the Apology

By: 
Eric Laursen
Date Published: 
September 14, 2004

The apology, coming from powerful institutions like the White House or a major metropolitan daily, is an art form. The art lies in crafting a mea culpa that confesses just enough to sound sincere, but without cutting so deeply as to call the institution’s motives into question. In the case of corporate news media, Rule No. 1 goes like this: Admit to being duped by your sources if you must, or even to editorial incompetence. But never admit to having made a willful, selective use of the evidence in front of you. In other words, that the institution itself must change. The editors of the New York Times made a dramatic apology on May 26.

The Left & Gay Marriage

By: 
Kouross Esmaeli
Date Published: 
September 14, 2004

Images of same sex couples kissing in wedlock on the evening news has literally screwed the right-wing agenda of family values. The debates have come at a time when the right wing has seemed unstoppable, and the mainstream gay establishment deserves much credit for successfully inserting itself in the public discourse.

However, from the radical Queer politics expressed in the last issue of Left Turn to left liberal theorists writing in The Nation, progressives seem to not understand this event for what it shows: the right wing is having to battle over their agenda of family values, at least when it comes to rallying the majority of Americans against gays and lesbians. It shows that there’s still some life in the sick, and perhaps dying, American body politic.

The Second Superpower? Prospects for the Anti-War Movement

By: 
Sasha Wright
Date Published: 
September 14, 2004

On March 20, 2003, I lay on Market Street in San Francisco with my affinity group blocking a major thoroughfare. Two months of frenzied organizing prepared for this moment when about 20,000 people around the Bay Area decided that they would not move one inch to allow business to go on as usual when we knew that bombs were starting to rain down on Baghdad and kill people. Such a visible resistance by US citizens to the start of war reverberated around the world that day.

Over a year later, Iraqi civilians and US troops are dying every day under the on-going US occupation. In response, Iraqis from all backgrounds have developed a powerful intifada that leaves no doubt of the widespread hatred for the US occupation.

Palestine Solidarity Movement: Struggle for Unity

By: 
Matt Horton
Date Published: 
September 14, 2004
    As patience with the failed Oslo agreements was clearly breaking down nearly 4 years ago, a solidarity movement was beginning to pick up the pieces after thinking that the situation in Palestine was settled. When the inevitable second intifada exploded, activists responded quickly and hundreds of autonomous organizations emerged in North America, joining with the world to support the uprising and condemn Israeli aggression. But the movement these activists created was not without its difficulties. Palestine solidarity activist Matt Horton takes a critical look back.

In the early heady stages of the intifada, as a US-based solidarity movement began to take shape, prospects for launching a diverse and powerful coalition of forces looked promising.

The Iraq War’s Oil Timeline

By: 
Antonia Juhaz
Date Published: 
June 01, 2006
    “Although the final decision for inviting foreign investment ultimately rests with a representative Iraqi government, I believe in due course the invitation will come.” ––Peter J. Robertson, Chevron Vice Chairman, 2003

Amid all the talk of training Iraqi soldiers, heading off a civil war, and protecting Iraq’s fledging democracy, one overriding agenda has been ignored in the debate over the time-table for bringing US troops home: President Bush will not withdraw US forces until US oil companies have secure access to Iraq’s oil. The process of securing this access involves four steps.

Rethinking Solidarity

By: 
Adjoa Jones de Almeida, Dana Kaplan, Paula X. Rojas, Eric Tang, and M. Mayuran Tiruchelvam
Date Published: 
June 01, 2006
    If Huey Newtown were alive today, he’d be on the verge of a political comeback. Not because of the supposed shout-out he’s getting from the Boondocks cartoon, but because of a concept he was pushing during the early 1970s—revolutionary intercommunalism.

The idea was simple. We no longer live in a moment where nation-states have the grand relevance they once did. The rise of a truly global capitalism, by its very nature, has always gone beyond territorial limitations. Therefore, as revolutionaries, Huey said, we need to start thinking about ourselves “intercommunally” as opposed to internationally.
If placed in present-day dialogue, Huey’s concept is anything but new.

Notes from the Global Intifada: 5-Year Anniversary Editorial

By: 
Left Turn Editorial Collective
Date Published: 
June 01, 2006
    Over the past five years, Left Turn magazine has become a resource for many organizers and activists through our in-depth news coverage of politics, media, and social movements in the US and globally. In all of our work, we have strived to project a non-sectarian, non-dogmatic, radical critique of corporate globalization and imperialism and shine a focus on concrete alternatives. But perhaps what makes Left Turn unique from much of the other alternative media is that at the core, Left Turn is a political project.

The magazine serves as a movement publication, working to reflect and support the grassroots. By playing this role, it has attempted to connect key pieces of the vibrant yet still very fractured radical movements here in the US.

Left Revival in Chile?

By: 
Eric Tang
Date Published: 
June 01, 2006
    This January, Chileans elected the second Socialist Party candidate since the Pinochet dictatorship and the first woman ever to the presidency. Will the new administration be part of the shift to the left that is challenging neoliberal policies across South America, or will Bachelet bow to the economic and military demands of Washington?

On election day in Chile, throngs of women gather at the vote tally at the Estadio Nacional de Chile (National Stadium) to rally for socialist candidate Michelle Bachelet. Along with the rest of the country, they anxiously await the final results of Chile’s presidential runoffs.