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Trading Fear for Hope: SOA Watch in Latin America

By: 
Wes Enzinna
Date Published: 
August 01, 2006
    Roy Bourgeois knows fear. As a Maryknoll Catholic priest working for human rights in the poor barrios of La Paz, Bolivia, during the 1971-1978 dictatorship of Hugo Banzer, Bourgeois saw many of his activist peers disappear and return with torture scars tattooed across their bodies or not return at all. One day in 1978, within less than a year of the kidnapping, torture, and murder of Catholic Priest Luis Espinal, Roy too was abducted, dragged away in the night, and thrown into a La Paz prison cell. Luckily, he was released shortly after and exiled.

This March, almost thirty years later, Roy returned to Bolivia.

SIR! NO SIR!

By: 
Steve Theberge
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

Sir! No Sir!, the poignant new documentary from filmmaker David Zeiger, could not have been released at a more relevant or important moment. Tracing the evolution of GI resistance from 1965 to 1975, the film uses an agile blend of interviews, stock footage, and personal narratives to unearth a story of resistance that defined a generation.
In 84 taut, fast-paced minutes, Sir!

CLANDESTINES: THE PIRATE JOURNALS OF AN IRISH EXILE

By: 
Juliana Fredman
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

Clandestines is a collection of short stories operating as a psychogeography of social and revolutionary movements from the late 1980’s on, mapped by a radicalized Irish anti-authoritarian. Moving from the Old to the New World, the stories track the convulsions of the global system and its revolutionary undercurrents through the experience of our erstwhile story-teller. His astute observations embellish reporting, advocacy and tall tales of unpredictable characters and communities to construct an optimistic, perhaps quixotic take on these end times. At its heart it is a testament to hope for the world vibrantly illustrated by hand drawn maps and black and white photographs.

The first section of the book details radical movements in Europe.

ABOLITION DEMOCRACY: BEYOND EMPIRE, PRISONS, & TORTURE

By: 
Kenyon Farrow
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

It must be hard to be an icon. People continue to imagine you as they did whenever it was you achieved iconic status. In the case of Angela Davis, she will, like it or not, always be associated with her afro, and that moment during her trial in 1972 when she raised the Black Power fist to the cameras in the courtroom.

I am not immune to this predicament, as I too, have an image of Angela Davis that I cling to in some way. While obsessed with the image of her as the badass sista standing up to the white establishment, we often forget that what first got her into trouble with the state of California was her intellectual work as a Marxist academic, teaching for the University of California system.

DIVAS DON’T YIELD

By: 
Stephanie Gentry-Fernández
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

When I heard the phrase “Chica Lit,” I couldn’t help but picture super-femme straight Latinas that wear shoes that cost more than my couch—similar to “Sex in the City,” but with an all-Latina cast. Something about the up-and-coming genre didn’t mesh with my flea-market shopping, bad haircut sporting, comfortable shoe wearing, Queer Mestiza revolucionaria self. But thanks to Quintero, my own definition of Chica Lit has expanded to include Queer women, badly-dressed women, women who are still “figuring it out,” women who got their volunteer/activist self going on and maintain that self while talking to their folks, fierce freedom-fighting women, and survivors.

NOTHING BUT AN UNFINISHED SONG: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BOBBY SANDS

By: 
Seamus Connolly
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

Bobby Sands died 25 years ago on May 5th in the Maze Prison in Belfast, North of Ireland. He died blinded by the 66-day hunger strike he had undertaken as a final protest against the British policy of criminalizing Irish Republican prisoners.

When he passed, thousands around the world took to the streets to protest the British government’s continued oppression of Irish political prisoners and the parliaments of several countries passed motions of sympathy and declared days of mourning and minutes of silence. Fidel Castro even referred to Bobby and the men following in his footsteps (nine others died on the hunger strike protest) in a speech: “Tyrants shake in the presence of men who are able to die for the ideals, after sixty days of hunger strike!

TOWARDS LAND, WORK & POWER: CHARTING A PATH OF RESISTANCE TO US-LED IMPERIALISM

By: 
Lauren Anzaldo
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

POWER gets around. At the Poor People’s Summit to End Global Poverty, at the massive three-day march to Miami to protest the FTAA, and in its organizing campaigns among San Francisco’s low- and no-wage workers, POWER has honed its ability to connect local people and local issues to the global struggle against imperialism. Now the organization—the full name of which is People Organized to Win Employment Rights—has put forth a book that easily breaks down imperialism and neoliberalism and then presents a hopeful alternative to these oppressive systems.

Towards Land, Work & Power is authored by the four committee members of POWER’s Amandla Project. The Amandla Project began as a space for anti-imperialist POWER leaders to connect more deeply to the global justice movement.

Strangling Palestine

By: 
Adam Hanieh
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

On May 15, 2006, we commemorated 58 years since Palestinians were driven out of their homes and land by Zionist aggression in 1948. Over 5 million Palestinian refugees around the world remember this day and continue to hold the right of return as the bedrock demand of the Palestinian struggle. The month of June brought the 29th commemoration of Al Nakba, the dispossession of hundreds of thousands more Palestinians and the subsequent occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in 1967. The program of ethnic cleansing symbolized by these two anniversaries continues at full speed.

Dissolving Barriers: New Orleans’ Latino Health Outreach Project

By: 
Catherine Jones and Jennifer Whitney
Date Published: 
January 01, 0001
    The sun is still below the horizon when we arrive: three cars, many boxes of supplies, and five to ten people wearing scrubs, most of us women. Hazily, as the coffee is still kicking in, we begin to set up treatment stations on the hoods of cars and the beds of pickups. The parking lot we’re in and the one across the street are sparking with activity as about one hundred people, mostly male Latino day laborers, look for work in the still-devastated city of New Orleans.

The men gather, ask each other what vaccines they should get, share information about employers who don’t pay, and tell us about their families back in Texas, Veracruz, or Bahia.

The US Occupation of Border Communities

By: 
Alexis Mazón
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

The recent mass uprisings demanding full rights for all immigrants have also been an expression of collective rage against the horrific abuses diverse immigrant communities have suffered for years. Millions live under the constant threat of racist harassment, workplace exploitation, round-ups, imprisonment, and deportation.

Daily living conditions for immigrants and citizens of color along the US-Mexico border have been particularly bad during the past twelve years of aggressive border militarization polices which have wreaked havoc on human rights in the Southwest.