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Part 3: Enter the Intergalactic! The Zapatistas’ Sixth Declaration in the US and the World

By: 
RJ Maccani
Date Published: 
September 01, 2006

September 2006

    (A different version will appear in Issue 3 of Autonomy and Solidarity’s journal, Upping the Anti.)

INTRODUCTION

The Zapatistas, an army of indigenous Mayans and their support communities in Mexico’s southernmost state of Chiapas, have had a profound influence on people’s movements around the world.

Crime and New Orleans

By: 
Jordan Flaherty
Date Published: 
October 12, 2005

reliefNOPeople from New Orleans were not surprised to see video of police beating a 64-year-old man in the French Quarter. The only surprise is the increased attention the incident received due to the continued media focus on New Orleans, although news reports I saw took pains to point out the "high levels of stress" New Orleans police are under.

Despite the attempts to explain away the officer's behavior, the incident fits into a well-defined pattern of police conduct in New Orleans.

Update from Families and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children

By: 
Jordan Flaherty, Families and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children
Date Published: 
September 23, 2005

from fflic.org

Friday, September 23, 2005
Dear Friends and Allies,

I spent yesterday in New Orleans, where residents are once again preparing for storm and flooding. In Treme, I spoke with Al, Chief of the Northside Skulls Skeleton Crew, a vital institution of Black Mardi Gras. He hasn't left yet, and says he isn't leaving now. "We're holding on," he says. "I've got plenty of food - I've been feeding people from all over. Let me know if you need anything." I also spoke with the activists from Food Not Bombs, who have set up a food distribution network from a house on Desire Street, and are working on setting up a medical clinic.

Community and Resistance

By: 
Jordan Flaherty
Date Published: 
November 25, 2005

A couple months before New Orleans flooded, I remember walking through my neighborhood on a sunny weekend afternoon and hearing music.

I followed the sound a couple blocks, to where about thirty people, all of them Black, followed a few musicians through the streets. They were mourning the death of a loved one, New Orleans-style. Most folks were wearing custom t-shirts with a picture of the deceased. Next to the photo were the words “sunrise” along with the date of his birth, and “sunset,” above the date of his (recent) death - he was 20.

Mercenary Industry Poses Problems for Latin America

By: 
Cyril Mychalejko
Date Published: 
January 01, 0001

Sgt.

Service to What End?

By: 
Kali Akuno
Date Published: 
January 01, 0001

A contribution to the debate on the dichotomy between organizing and service provision in the New Afrika liberation movement

In the wake of the monumental achievement of Hezbollah in repelling the Zionist invasion of Lebanon during the 33 day war in the summer of 2006, and the uncompromising resistance of the Palestinian Hamas since its electoral victory in the winter of 2006, a line is being advanced by various forces within the New Afrikan or Black Liberation Movement that these organizations and the means they employ to organize their people should be emulated as models to organize our own.

Navajo People Power vs. Corporate Coal Power

By: 
Jeff Conant
Date Published: 
June 16, 2007
    “I am a rancher. I have lived off of cattle, off of sheepherding. Now the land is being eaten away day by day, by oil fences, coal mining, new power plants. My cattle have nothing to eat, the water is polluted, the air is dirty, Life itself has sunken. The very basis of economic development for my family has diminished far below poverty level to where I can barely survive.

Increasing Precarity: The Politics of Migrant Labor

By: 
Harsha Walia
Date Published: 
June 22, 2007

This is an expanded version of the article that appeared in Left Turn #25

According to the United Nations, nearly 400 million people are migrant workers inside their own countries or outside their countries of birth. Whether in search of refuge or a more prosperous future, people are increasingly migrating. Historically, during England’s Industrial Revolution, peasants who were displaced from their farmlands were forced to migrate to cities and worked for scanty wages in growing industries.

Injustice in Jena, Louisiana as Nooses Hang from the White Tree

By: 
Bill Quigley
Date Published: 
July 10, 2007

In a small still mostly segregated section of rural Louisiana, an all white jury heard a series of white witnesses called by a white prosecutor testify in a courtroom overseen by a white judge in a trial of a fight at the local high school where a white student who had been making racial taunts was hit by black students. The fight was the culmination of a series of racial incidents starting when whites responded to black students sitting under the “white tree” at their school by hanging three nooses from the tree.

Statement From The Families of the "Jena Six"

By: 
Caseptla Bailey
Date Published: 
July 13, 2007

This letter is an attempt to shed light on the recent ruling in the trial of Mychal Bell.

It is important for the public to understand that Mychal did not receive proper or fair representation from his attorney, the "public defender."

First, why didn't the attorney (Blane Williams) challenge the fact that these kids are being charged as adults for a schoolyard fight? Why wasn't a change of venue filed in this case, even though it has received so much attention locally? What did Justin Barker as well as his friends do to these young men to provoke harass, intimidate and hassle them?