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"I Cannot Live as I Like": A '48 Refugee Remembers

By: 
Naji Ali
Date Published: 
April 09, 2008

Sitting in a chair inside his cluttered shop filled with school supplies, chain-smoking Marlboro cigarettes, Abdul Salam Hammad Abdullah peers out onto the streets. Passersby wave to him as he acknowledges them.

No Backing Down on Palestinian Right of Return

By: 
Mazen Masri
Date Published: 
April 09, 2008

On April 19, 1956, Moshe Dayan, then Chief of Staff of the Israeli Army, said in a eulogy at the funeral of an Israeli who was killed by Palestinian refugees turned fighters: Right of Return "Early yesterday morning Roi was murdered. The quiet of the spring morning dazzled him and he did not see those waiting in ambush for him, at the edge of the furrow. Let us not cast the blame on the murderers today.

Darfur and the Politics of Race: Understanding the Save Darfur Coalition

By: 
Hishaam D. Aidi
Date Published: 
November 01, 2007
    The Save Darfur campaigns are better understood by looking at the post-September 11 US political scene. Unlike other “hot spots” across Africa, the Darfur tragedy reverberates deeply in the US because it is represented as a racial conflict between “Arabs” and “indigenous Africans,” and because the Darfur crisis offers a unique opportunity to unite against the new post-Cold War enemy. While some involved in the campaigns have been seeking genuine ways to support Darfurians—opportunists have racialized the conflict in order to divide Arabs and Africans by playing on historic and manufactured (colonial) divisions in Sudan.

Education Versus Incarceration in Tallulah, Louisiana

By: 
Jordan Flaherty
Date Published: 
November 14, 2007

Tallulah is a small town in Northeastern Louisiana, one of the poorest regions in the US. It is about 90 miles from the now-legendary town of Jena, and like Jena it is a town with a large youth prison that was closed after allegations of abuse and brutality. Also like Jena, residents of Tallulah are involved in a modern civil rights struggle.

So Much for the Success of the Surge

By: 
Rami El-Amine
Date Published: 
June 01, 2008

The relative decline in violence in Iraq that Bush, McCain and other supporters of the war have attributed to the “surge” appears to have begun increasing again. Al Qaeda and others in the Sunni resistance began stepping up their attacks at the beginning of the year and Moqtada Al Sadr’s Mahdi Army has been battling US and Iraqi forces almost non stop since the Iraqi military’s attacked them in Basra on March 25. April was the deadliest month for US troops since September 2007 with 50 casualties, most of who were killed in and around the Mahdi Army’s stronghold of Sadr City.

OPENINGS AND POSSIBILITIES: The Meaning of Obama

By: 
KAZEMBE BALAGUN and HANK WILLIAMS
Date Published: 
June 14, 2008

How does the Black left engage and understand the historic presidential campaign of Barack Obama? This question is in the hearts and minds of African-American radicals around the country.

With the nomination of Barack Obama increasingly likely, there seems to be a significant block forming within the Black left community agreeing to lend a kind of “critical support” to his campaign.

Organizing for Freedom in Angola Prison

By: 
Jordan Flaherty
Date Published: 
June 01, 2008

At the heart of Louisiana’s prison system sits the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, a former slave plantation where little has changed in the last several-hundred years. Angola has been made notorious from books and films such as Dead Man Walking and The Farm: Life at Angola, as well as its legendary bi-annual prison rodeo and The Angolite, a prisoner-written magazine published within its walls. Visitors are often overwhelmed by its size – 18,000 acres that include a golf course (for use by prison staff and some guests), a radio station, and a massive farming operation that ranges from staples like soybeans and wheat to traditional Southern plantation crops like cotton.
Recent congressional attention has again brought Angola into the media limelight.

Nothing About Us, Without Us! - Interview with Leroy Moore

By: 
James Tracy
Date Published: 
October 01, 2007

Leroy F. Moore, Jr. is a radical Black organizer in the disability and racial justice movements. He works with Disability Advocates of Minorities Organization, Poor Magazine, and Harambee Educational Council, an organization for parents, advocates and young adults focused African Americans with disabilities. Long a fixture in the anti-police brutality and homelessness efforts nationwide; he is now taking on the hip-hop industry with a groundbreaking compilation of disabled rappers: Krip-Hop.

Increasing Precarity: The Politics of Migrant Labor

By: 
Harsha Walia
Date Published: 
June 22, 2007

This is an expanded version of the article that appeared in Left Turn #25

According to the United Nations, nearly 400 million people are migrant workers inside their own countries or outside their countries of birth. Whether in search of refuge or a more prosperous future, people are increasingly migrating. Historically, during England’s Industrial Revolution, peasants who were displaced from their farmlands were forced to migrate to cities and worked for scanty wages in growing industries.